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Guide to CrossFit Lingo

Getting into a Cross Fit lifestyle can be difficult, but sometimes even the jargon can be mystifying. If you’re an athlete and you’ve dedicated yourself to a clean-eating health-conscious lifestyle, you might not realize how you sound to those on the outside. For those just getting started, we’ve compiled a short list of words you might hear from those in the business.  
  1. Box
Those with friends in CrossFit might wonder why their friends keep talking about the different boxes they’ve tried. A CrossFit “box” is actually just a gym. Though the buildings are definitely more than cardboard squares, the reason CrossFit gyms are called boxes is because of the simplicity of the space.
  1. Macros
Besides being a Greek word for “large,” flexible dieting is just simpler form of calorie counting. The “if it fits your macros” diet lets you eat what you want, while still aiming for a certain amount of nutrients per day. So, as long as you get the correct amount of protein, carbs, and fat per day, what you eat doesn’t really matter.
  1. Clean
Usually followed by the word eating, “clean” refers to eating the healthiest food possible. Those who are eating “clean” are doing more than washing their food before consumption – they’re limiting processed foods, cutting down on fats, adding veggies, and cutting alcohol
  1. Cheat
Cheating on your diet is either having a cheat meal or a cheat day to eat what you want regardless of whatever diet plan or lifestyle choice you’ve made. Cheating can be part of your diet though – some allow for cheat days as part of the regular plan. So don’t be surprised if you suddenly start to crave those days you can cheat!
  1. WOD
A “WOD” is just what it stands for – the workout of the day. The term is commonly used in CrossFit, but people also use it in a variety of contexts depending on the lifestyle plan they’re on or what their workouts consist of. You don’t need to be a CrossFit guru – just a person who works out!
  1. Plate
“I lifted two plates today!” The sentence might not seem very impressive – we’ve all probably lifted more than two plates at once in our lives. But athletes, typically bodybuilders, aren’t talking about your average dinner plate. Plates usually refer to weights of different sizes – some barbells with enough plates go up to 225 lbs.    

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